This Is Why The Millennials’ Singles Lifestyle May Be On A Collision Course With Caregiving & Retirement

This Is Why The Millennials’ Singles Lifestyle May Be On A Collision Course With Caregiving & Retirement

AgeLab Director Joseph Coughlin writes in Forbes about the potential disruptiveness of younger generations' preferences for single living:

"Data suggest that traditional life stages, such as finding a partner and having children, are occurring at older ages than previous generations. US Centers for Disease Control data and Statistics Canada data show that the only cohort of women with an increasing birthrate are women over 40-years old. That is not necessarily a problem, but having children closer to traditional midlife may collide with other family roles such as caring for an aging parent. A 40-year old mother with a newborn, or toddler, is likely to have a parent that is much older, and have more needs, than a first-time mother in her 30s.

Extended singlehood, and delays in having children, are likely to intensify the challenges of balancing career and children with caring for aging parents – making the coming sandwich generation of Millennials feel more like a hard-pressed panini."

Read Dr. Coughlin's thoughts in full via Forbes.