Student presents findings on Google Maps/GPS destination entry at international conference

Student presents findings on Google Maps/GPS destination entry at international conference

Thu, 10/10/2013

*Update*

In April 2013, MIT graduate students Celena Dopart, Anders Haggman, and Cameron Thornberry received the Volpe Best Transportation Presentation Award for their research paper entitled "A Driving Simulation Study Examining Destination Entry with iOS 5 Google Maps and a Garmin Portable GPS System." Ms. Dopart, an AeroAstro Master's candidate in the Man Vehicle Lab, presented this paper at Volpe Transportation Center on October 10th as part of this award. She had recently returned from San Diego, where she presented the same research at the 2013 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society in San Diego, CA.
 

*October 1, 2013*

MIT Aeronautics and Astronautics Master’s candidate Celena Dopart presented a paper at the 2013 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society held in San Diego, CA from Sept 20-Oct 4. The paper, “A Driving Simulation Study Examining Destination Entry with iOS 5 Google Maps and a Garmin Portable GPS System,” was co-authored by MIT Mechanical Engineering PhD candidate Anders Haggman, AeroAstro Master’s candidate Cameron Thornberry, and AgeLab researchers Bruce Mehler, Johnathan Dobres, and Bryan Reimer. The three graduate students work in human factors affiliated labs—Ms. Dopart in the Man Vehicle Lab, Mr. Haggman in the Ideation Lab, and Mr. Thornberry in the System Safety Research Lab. This research was completed as part of the Human Factors Engineering class and was previously presented by Mr. Haggman at the 2013 HFES New England Chapter Student Research Conference in Cambridge, MA on April 14, 2013, where it received the Volpe Best Transportation Presentation Award.

An abstract of the paper is given below.

A simulation study compared 23 young adult drivers’ task completion time, mean glance time, number of glances, and percentage of long glances while performing a navigation entry task with a Garmin portable GPS system and a mobile navigation application (iOS 5 Google Maps) on an iPod Touch. We compared participants’ performance on these tasks using the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) eye-glance acceptance criteria. We found that, irrespective of the device used, no participant was able to complete the task within the recommended total time window of 12 seconds. When entering a destination into the iOS interface, only 73.9% of the drivers meet the NHTSA criteria for long duration glances. With the Garmin system, 91.3% of the participants meet this criterion. All participants were able to maintain adequate mean off road glance durations. Finally, we compared the NHTSA recommended method of assessing all off road glances to more traditional methods of assessing glances only to the task interface. Differences between the two methods are discussed.

 

MIT AgeLab
1 Main Street, 9th Floor
Cambridge, MA 02142
ph: 617.253.0753
email: agelabinfo(at)mit.edu

Go to top